Ash Nallawalla's blog

GTrends free tool finds keyphrases with low competition

I attended an informative talk by Glen Staiger about his experience with the “30 Day Challenge”, which included a mention of the free Wordtracker tool known as GTrends. It is a keyphrase competitiveness research tool, which is an extension of the free Wordtracker search tool.

My friend had blogged about Iron Maiden’s videos taken during their recent Indian tour and this had swelled his visitor count (briefly) by a huge number that I won’t reveal. So I used some Iron Maiden related phrases to test GTrends.

To check any keyphrase, type it in the Keyword field and look at the results:

GTrends result

Click to enlargeClick the bar graph icon on the right of any keyphrase and you will get a popup like the image to the right (click it to enlarge). If both bars (representing Google Competition – the number of results is less than 30k – and the number of Google visitors per day is more than 140) are green, then this is a keyphrase worthy of more research.

Now the count for Iron Maiden Tour in the popup is a lot more than 25, which I can’t explain, but I created a small blog to monitor its traffic. The above is the only link I am giving it, although it might attract one or two from elsewhere as I populate the blog later on. Check out the free tool!

Ash Nallawalla

Search strategist experienced in large, complex websites. Ash's Google+ profile

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3 Comments

  • Tracy Fredrychowski on 10 February 2008

    Ash it is great that you are bringing this feature to light. So many Web site owners could really benefit from using a keyword research tool like Wordtracker. I just wrote a blog post about using Wordtracker that ties in well with your post.

    http://searchengineacademysc.com/blog/2008/01/23/wordtracker-made-easy-in-6-steps/

    GTrends is just another part of a already great SEO too.

  • Benjamin on 11 February 2008

    Hi Ash,

    I wanted to let you know that I have written a tool that automates the GTrends process completely. It is a free tool that I give away on my website. All you have to do is put a list of keywords in a textbox and hit process keywords. The software then will take each keyword and compute the GTrends count and competing web page count for you. Once it is finished, you simply view the results and sort, filter as you like.

    I’m not trying to spam links, I just wanted to let you know about it. If you try it and like it, then I will let you put a link to the tool for your readers.

    Best Wishes,

    Benjamin

  • Vintage Pinup on 2 May 2008

    Hi Ash,
    nice article. This tool is a real mystery! In the example above, why exactly do they say you’ll get more visits from #1 at google (175) than (their own figure) of the total number of searches across all search engines for this term (33)?
    Either:
    – Their wordtracker scores are widely inaccurate (possible)
    – Google has released only limited information, and so GTrends is inaccurate
    – Some people are typing “Iron Maiden Tour” directly into the URL bar and bypassing search engines (but the results speak about #1 at google being important)
    – Some people are coming back again and again a day (which makes this number meaningless, not uniques).
    – Or something else I can’t work out.
    If you or anyone had some information on how this tool generates its (strange) figures, I’d love to hear!

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